Interpreting portions of the sprawling 8-mile-long ‘canvas’ discovered in the Amazon rainforest

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In a previous post, I discussed the immense mural found in the Colombian Amazon, as well as an interaction that I had with the researchers who discovered it. In this post, I will interpret some of the mural contents from the perspective that there was a worldwide flood and that ensuing ecosystem changes made survival difficult for most animals, especially so for those that inhabited the former abyss.

I will concentrate on a portion of one of the images found in many articles reporting the discovery of the mural. A few comments before doing so: (1) Some of the articles mention that the Amazon was transforming from savannah to rain forest at the time the mural was created. This is correct; the introduction of the worldwide flood waters 12,800+/- years before present – essentially the same time as the mural’s creation – induced planet-wide climate changes and, therefore, local environmental changes. (2) Some articles claim that humans hunted some species to extinction. This is incorrect: all known extinctions at this time (e.g., the Younger-Dryas extinctions) were caused by changed environments.

In this analysis, I assume that time moves upward, that triangular waves represent water, and that rectangles represent landforms. Here is a portion of the mural found in many of the articles reporting the mural’s discovery.

In the blue oval, below, is a region of pre-Flood Earth with which the mural’s author(s) was(were) familiar. To the left is a large land mass (square with dots aligned in an X pattern). Perhaps the dots inside the square represent trees, or maybe the interior pattern is meant to convey the shape of mountains. This region was separated from other landforms by a ridge (vertical lines enclosing cross hatches). In the center of the oval were two major inhabited areas that included water, animals such as deer, and humans. I am not sure what the square waves (on the right) represent, though I suspect it could be an uninhabitable region because humans lived outside it (below and to its right).

The next oval captures the Flood’s effects. Note that the introduction of the water has covered the ridges, one of the square landforms that was between them, and most of the uninhabitable regions (square waves). Note that the animals are headed toward the central square! They were flushed out of their natural domains by the water, and they headed toward survival on dry land.

By the way, this explanation accounts for the diversity of creatures found in the Galapagos Islands – non-indigenous species survived upward and those that could adapt are now found mixed in with indigenous species.

In the next image, the arrows capture the time evolution of the two land masses that remain exposed after the Flood. If the dots inside the square represent trees, then it demonstrates the transformation of the region associated with the yellow arrows from steppe to rainforest.

In the uppermost oval we observe that a subset of the animals from the central oval is leaving the region. This might represent the extinction of some species. In addition, the outward migration reflects that some surviving species could not adapt to the region’s Flood-induced ecosystem changes. (Note that the four-legged creature with large ears found in all three ovals survives the ordeal. Could it be a flying squirrel or a bat?)

Hand prints in another image are found above the triangular wave. The meaning: I am human, I survived the Flood, and I wanted you to know.

Also, it appears that pre-Flood vegetation (plant leaves below the triangular wave and to the right of the hand) differs from the vegetation that survivors encountered afterward, depicted to the right of the hand prints. It would be fascinating to understand the human pre-Flood diet and how it differs from what we now consume….

Does the mural depict the IO’s appearance and debris trail on Earth approach?

In my paper (and book), I refer to the celestial object that delivered the Flood as the IO (impacting object). It was very large, about 1500 miles in diameter, and it was made up primarily of loosely compacted ice chunks. It was loosely packed due to very small gravitational accelerations (relative to Earth) induced by its solid core that attracted ice and other debris in the Oort Cloud where it formed. The IO would have been visible for many years prior to its impact, and, along its way, the Sun’s gravitational acceleration and other forces would cause the IO to shed some chunks that we now call comets. Its sun-illuminated approach would have made a lasting impression….

The IO’s path led to its capture by Earth’s gravity, as well as its ensuing impact in what is now the Southern Ocean. Back-propagating the IO’s core impact trough reveals that its pre-impact approach path overflew North America, Central America, and South America. Schematics of the approach path are shown, below. The first is a side view showing that the IO was highest over North America during approach, which would account for the continent-wide spread in its debris field (from off the Monterey, CA, coast to the Carolina Bays).

The second depicts the IO’s core overflight “shadow” just prior to impact.

On its approach, the IO would shed a long tail of debris that created impact craters in North America, South America, and South Africa. Examples of impact craters are shown below:

Carolina Bays (North America):

California coast (North America):

Colombia (South America):

Argentina (South America):

South Africa:

The orientation of this South African crater is essentially perpendicular to those from the Western Hemisphere because the IO nearly overflew Antarctica as it neared impact.

The fragile IO split in two just before impact, and this accounts for the gap in the impact crescent.

Identical perspectives of the IO impact site in the Southern Ocean include: (top) bathymetry image with a superimposed diameter that measure 1500 miles (2500 km); and (bottom) a magnetic anomaly overlay. Note the parallel central scrapes, scoured by the IO’s solid core, that are perpendicular to the blue diameter segment (top) and corroborated by a red band (bottom). To the northwest of the impact site is South Africa (upper left), and to its south (below) is Antarctica.

The IO split was also recorded in a South African cave painting, shown below and described here.

Why all this? Because the mural tells the story of what survivors encountered, and it is nearly certain that they witnessed the debris that rained down as the IO flew overhead. As such, I strongly suspect that somewhere in the mural is a depiction of the debris storm.

Two final comments:

  • It would be interesting to know if anyone was “in charge” of the mural, as well as how many years it captures.
  • The Flood completely changed the Earth, it created a horrific scenario for inhabitants, and survivors wanted to tell their story. The Amazon mural is another commemoration of the event.

Sprawling 8-mile-long ‘canvas’ of ice age beasts discovered hidden in Amazon rainforest

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Ice age canvas painted 12,600 years ago discovered hidden in Amazon rainforest

A report detailing the discovery of an 8-mile long mural appears in “Colonisation and early peopling of the Colombian Amazon during the Late Pleistocene and the Early Holocene: New evidence from La Serranía La Lindosa,” available here. According to the paper, indigenous people likely started painting the images at Serranía La Lindosa, on the northern edge of the Colombian Amazon, about 12,600 years before present.

The thousands of paintings include handprints, geometric designs, and a wide array of animals, from the small (deer, tapir, alligators, bats, monkeys, turtles, serpents, porcupines) to the large (camelids, horses, and three-toed hoofed mammals with trunks). Other figures depict humans, hunting scenes, and images of people interacting with plants, trees, and savannah creatures.

According to one of the paper’s authors, at the time the paintings were created, the Amazon was transforming from a patchwork landscape of savannas, thorny scrub, and forests into today’s leafy tropical rainforest. He added that many of South America’s large animals went extinct during this period, likely through a combination of human hunting and climate change.

“These rock paintings are spectacular evidence of how humans reconstructed the land, and how they hunted, farmed, and fished,” study co-researcher José Iriarte, an archaeologist at the University of Exeter, said in the statement. “It is likely art was a powerful part of culture and a way for people to connect socially.” 

A few comments on the report:

  • The transformation of the Amazon from savannah to rain forest is wholly due to the planet-wide climate change induced by the worldwide flood waters.
  • The extinctions were caused by the animals’ changed environments, not human hunting.

The images caused me to wonder: what would inspire ancients to create such an extensive memorialization? So, I contacted the authors of the paper with the following email:

“I came across your paper due to the appearance of findings in recent news reports (e.g. here). 

That you date the images to 12,600 years before present caught my attention. It is consistent with the ubiquitous nano-diamond layer formed by a cosmic impact at the Younger-Dryas boundary (approximately 12,800 years before present). I discuss the matter in my recent paper, The Flooding of the Mediterranean Basin at the Younger-Dryas Boundary, available here.

Your discovery prompts an important question: what would inspire the ancients to memorialize some event in an 8-mile long mural? The answer: survival after the Flood (discussed here).

I hope that you will keep this in mind as you go about deciphering the images. For instance, could the triangular waves represent the Flood’s waters? Could the block-shaped waves represent the ice that accompanied the newly introduced, planet-changing waters?

Regards,

Michael Jaye, PhD”