Two Questions for Geologists (Answers Provided)

6 Feb 2018

Geologists are getting closer to recognizing that there was a worldwide flood. This recent article mentions that geologists are certain that there was a massive impact 12,800 years before present. Geologists credit the impact with creating the planet’s ubiquitous nanodiamond layer (caused by high velocities at impact), as well as the Younger Dryas (YD) ecosystem changes. In addition, the papers mentioned in the article (links: here and here) claim that the impact caused widespread fires. (Note: it is unlikely that the impact itself caused immediate fires; rather, the incredible ecosystem changes would transform once forested regions into desiccated deserts. A bolt of lightning or volcanic ash, and, voila: widespread fires.)

Interestingly, nether of the scientific papers upon which the Universe Today article rests identifies the impact site. Certainly, it must have been a massive and high-energy impact so as to cause the distribution of nanodiamonds around the planet, as well as the associated YD ecosystem changes, fires, etc.

Thus, two questions for geologists:

  1. Where are the impact remnants?
  2. Since comets are predominantly water, then what of the melted ice? Where did all the water go?

Answers:

  1. The impact site is in the Southern Ocean, southeast of South Africa and SSE of Madagascar. The impact crescent in the upper image, below, measures approx. 1500 miles in diameter:

Impact and mag anomaly overlay 8Jan2018

[The lower of the two images is a magnetic anomaly map that corroborates that the object delivered minerals (such as iron and platinum) and other matter besides ice. In addition, the magnetic anomaly overlay shows that impact velocities scattered such materials nearly a thousand miles through the impact crescent’s gap (the impacting object, fragile as its comet fragments, was beginning to disintegrate at impact).​ In addition, the force of the impact is likely to have caused worldwide volcanic activity, which, along with lightning, would have served to initiate forest fires.]

  1. The waters flooded the planet, discussed here and here, as well as in my book.

 

The bottom line: there was a worldwide flood. To think otherwise is, well, unscientific.

About which: identification and discussion of geology’s historic error, as well as other evidence and analysis regarding the worldwide flood, are found in the articles, below. They are arranged in a manner so as to take the reader from the error’s commission to the data and analysis that revealed it:

Retraction Request Made to the Geological Society of London – I present an email exchange that demonstrates geologists’ intransigence regarding their commission of the most profound error in the history of science.

Galileo’s Telescope, Google Earth – As the telescope led to the end of geocentrism, so the new data (e.g. Google Earth) nullify geology’s prevailing paradigm that has us all believing that there was never a worldwide flood.

The Flood Waters: Source, Analysis, Remembrances – I use maps, recent scholarly publications, and some basic mathematics to determine the amount of water delivered by a cosmic impact nearly 13,000 years before present; we augment the analysis with historical accounts of the incident.

Scientific Paper: The Younger Dryas Extraterrestrial Impact – My submission to the Geological Society of London, 6 Jan 2018. In an earlier post, I presented an email exchange with the journal’s editors, requesting that they retract their predecessor’s historic error. They refused, claiming that such matters are left to be superseded by evidence. This paper presents such evidence, so I submitted it to them. They refused to publish it, not because of its content but rather because of its style.

Expedition Atlantis – I complement Plato’s description of Atlantis with map data to lay the foundation for an expedition to discover the city’s remnants and forever put to rest the idea that there was never a flood.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s